pressure treated vs environmental protection posts for pergola

when building an outdoor structure, should i use pressure

when building an outdoor structure, should i use pressure-treated lumber or something like cedar? ask question i'm not near an expert, but i just want to mention that there are many 'retention levels' of pressure treated lumber. for a post partially buried in the ground,

cedar vs. pressure treated posts - structural engineering

re: cedar vs. pressure treated posts boffintech civil/environmental 11 sep 07 18:34 the trouble with concrete footings for decks is that you have dig the hole, dispose of the spoils from the hole, buy the quikrete, haul the quikrete, mix and pour the quickrete, buy and place a post anchorage device, etc.

wooden pergolas pressure treated pine pergolas by

freestanding pine pergola. simple pressure treated pine pergolas are wonderful because the low cost of materials brings the price of the pergola down significantly. moreover, pressure treated southern yellow pine is designed to withstand the elements and last for years to come.

pergola price cost of a pergola: pressure-treated wood

cost of a pressure-treated wood pergola. pressure-treated wood is designed to be more resistant to rot and the elements than untreated lumber. in addition, these wood pergolas can be painted or stained any color that complements your backyard aesthetic. these are the average costs of pergolas made with pressure-treated lumber:

environmental protection timber pergolas - woodlandpizzact.com

home environmental protection timber pergolas. environmental protection timber pergolas. wpc product. attached bench to post; pool deck drains replacement; durable timber for your pergola ash . iron ash is treated to australian h3 standards, protecting your new pergola against when sourcing the timber for your pergola is the

classic pressure treated pine pergola kit - pergolakitsusa.com

decorate your landscape with our classic pergola kit. the perfect place for entertaining, relaxing, or simply daydreaming. with so many options to chose from, you can create the perfect outdoor setting.

how to use untreated lumber outside hunker

how to use untreated lumber outside by wade shaddy. save; pressure-treated wood is designed for outdoor applications. it protects wood against wind, sun, debris and moisture. treated wood lasts a lifetime when properly maintained. but treated wood is also associated with health issues. sealer or paint that contain uv protection. over-the

6 in. x 6 in. x 60 in. in-ground post decay protection

rated 5 out of 5 by diyguy from great option to protect posts installed in the ground i recently built a pole barn and was looking to add more rot and decay protection to the pressure treated posts that were set into the ground. compared to other options, the post protectors are more cost effective and simple to install.

how to maintain and care for your pergola - olt

how to maintain and care for your pergola backyard , diy , gazebos , how to , pergolas , western red cedar an outdoor pergola is an open structure that can be used for shade and can come with retractable canopies or climbing vines overtop.

vinyl vs. fiberglass vs. wood: which is the best pergola

we discuss which is the best pergola for your patio: vinyl vs. fiberglass vs. wood vinyl vs. fiberglass vs. wood: which is the best pergola for your patio? since the material is naturally corrosion resistant, it wont rust, corrode or pit, regardless of the environment its in. fiberglass is also non-porous, so it will not absorb

protecting fence posts from rot professional deck

when choosing wood for fence posts, check the end tag to confirm that the lumber is pressure-treated in accordance with either the canadian standards association, american wood protection association awpa , or international code commission icc . on the label, look for the products designated use category, or uc.

splits and cracks in 6x6 posts - professional deck builder

back about 20 mos ago i posted that i had used a two-part epoxy by loctite to fill some deep cracks and splits in 8' tall above grade pressure-treated 6x6 posts on my personal deck. i also applied the same epoxy to the face of any knots on those posts at the same time.

pergola 4x4 or 6x6 posts - 3rdbasewv.com

cedar vs. pressure-treated pine for pergola posts - building . i built a 10x12 pergola out of pressure treat using 6x6 posts 9'h and they to build a pergola using 4x4 pt posts as well as 2x6 pt stringers.

pressure treated vs untreated - fine homebuilding

this question relates to material selection for an arbor/ pergola. the design calls for 2×6 in 16 lengths and 4×4 posts. as an exterior project pressure treated lumber would be the obvious choice but untreated fir or pine would look a ton better and perhaps shrink and twist less.

3 reasons you should consider a pergola

a cedar pergola is more expensive than a pressure-treated pergola, but youll typically get a longer serviceable lifespan from cedar. vinyl: if youre looking for a pergola that requires very little maintenance, vinyl is certainly worth consideration. you cannot easily paint a vinyl pergola, however, so your color choices are limited.

pressure treated vs. cedar - decks and fencing - contractor talk

my local yard is carrying the lighter colored pressure treated. i've had a lot of people ask me if the lumber i was using was treated. i use only 1 for my decking boards and personally select them and they look great i think i am going to try to discourage them from cedar unless they are dead set on it for looks. which i don't think they are.

3 reasons you should consider a pergola

a cedar pergola is more expensive than a pressure-treated pergola, but youll typically get a longer serviceable lifespan from cedar. vinyl: if youre looking for a pergola that requires very little maintenance, vinyl is certainly worth consideration. you cannot easily paint a vinyl pergola, however, so your color choices are limited.

treated pine vs. cedar - woodweb.com

what likely happens is, the 4x's shrink, as they lose moisture, resulting in cracks. this leaves openings to the inner core of a post, where treatment is minimal, or has not reached at all. to be fair, cedar posts would not fare as well as treated pine in our environment. you may be lucky to get five years out of an old growth redwood cedar post.

what wood for a gazebo trouble free pool

the question is, what type of wood would you use. i have worked a lot with pressure treated in the past, but when i get it, its always wet, heavy and tends to bow. i put in a shade sail last year using 6x6 post and they all bent a bit i plan on paint the entire structure. do i have to use pressure treated for the roof and roof trusses?

pressure treated pine archives - pergola.com

pressure treated pine. the pressure treated pine that we supply is without a doubt the highest grade ptp that is available today. what we sell is a 1 grade dss dense select structural which is at the top of the list in the southern pine inspection bureau standard grading rules for southern pine lumber. this creates a pine pergola of

wood pergolas - landscaping network

pro tip: a pergola built of untreated wood is highly susceptible to wet and cold weather. without routine maintenance seasonal damage is likely to occur. one of the most common types of wood used for pergola construction is pressure-treated pine. pressure-treated pine, the most affordable option, is rot and insect resistant.

diy pergola plans how to plan and post a pergola

how to plan and post a perfect pergola i've built plenty of pergolas with pressure-treated lumber too--if you go that route, just make sure the lumber is rated for ground contact. vinyl and

what's the difference: pressure-treated lumber - fine

until 2004, pressure-treated wood for residential use was preserved with chromate copper arsenate cca , and the level of treatment was generally the same for all lumber. because of concerns over arsenics toxicity, cca has since been replaced for residential use by a host of preservatives, some

that deck post can't rot. it's been treated. - linkedin

that deck post can't rot. it's been treated. shown in the photo is 6' x 6' pressure treated lumber. so, yes, pressure treated wood can rot, although it might take awhile and require wet